Decision Making

Written by Rimma Tertytska - 12.01.2015
Book question. 3D modeling and rendering

Why is this calibration/strategy important?

Decision Making is one of the 6 primary calibrations Practitioners learn in the first day of their NLP training from Frank Pucelik. It is also the one that stands out from the rest of them.

Many new NLP learners are so overwhelmed by the amount of information there is to take in, that they rarely stop to ask – Why is decision making important and how can I use it in practice? In this article we’ll look at the benefits of knowing this calibration.

Do you know how you make decisions?

The truth is most people don’t. Most people don’t know how, when, or why their decision making process starts and/or how to stop it. In fact to many the idea of being able to stop yourself from making a decision is a very novel idea.

Scenario 1. Think about a time somebody came to you with a piece of information and you automatically decided to act on it. And a few days (hours, minutes) later you hear more on the topic and you realize… you made the decision to act too early. Wouldn’t you have loved to stop yourself and gather more information?

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Tip: *Start noticing when and how you make decisions so that you can be aware of the process. Ask yourself ‘Do I have enough information to make a decision about this now?’

Scenario 2. Many people say that when they are upset they make bad decisions. But they rarely make a rule for themselves not to make decision when feeling down. They understand the pattern and simply continue making decisions in spite of not feeling positive and as a result are often unhappy about their decisions in general.

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Tip: *If you have noticed that decisions made when you felt far from your best didn’t bring you positive results, analyze how you feel when you make your best decisions. Establish a new rule for yourself – I make decisions only when I’m feeling comfortable, confident (list the states you want).

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Tip: *Learn to establish positive state when you want to, and any time will be a good time for a good decision.

Scenario 3. Other times you may be faced with a decision you keep on putting off, since you simply don’t know how to make it.

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Tip: *Learn what triggers the decision making strategy (TOTE model), and trigger it yourself when you wish to. ‘Putting off’ will be a scenario of the past.

Scenario 4.  Another situation people often come across is they make a decision, but they didn’t exit the process (TOTE model). So they continue thinking about it without realizing, the answer is there. They can spend unnecessary time going around in circles.

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Tip: *Find out what your exit from decision making is(TOTE model). Whatever the cue (visual, kinesthetic, auditory or other), be able to use it and allow yourself to exit this process.

Decision making is an extremely valuable calibration/strategy that will give you a much more useful variety of choices and help you be more effective. Practice it, master it and better results will come fast.

And remember “Knowledge is not a skill. Knowledge plus 10,000 times is a skill.” – Schinichi Suzuki.

What are your scenarios for using decision making? Tell us about it below.

 

!Be the first to name the other 5 calibrations and win a PDF copy of ’Magic of NLP Demystified’. Write your answers in the comments below.

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Posted Under: Developing
8 comments
Daniela Floroiu
Daniela Floroiu

When it comes to a difficult decision, I  put myself in the second perceptual position.

Most of the times, I use a sheet of paper and a pen and I write questions for myself to answer, and then l answer these questions as I would answer another person.


On second though, I am 80% detached from myself, I see myself from the outside and I make decisions like they are someone else's.


It works very well for me. 

MetaInternational
MetaInternational moderator

@Daniela Floroiu Great strategy, Daniela! 

Have you explored why making decisions as if they were someone else's works for you better than making decisions as if for yourself?

Tudor Borza
Tudor Borza

Postive Active

Positive Passive

Negative Active

Negative Passive

Interested

Rosty
Rosty

Positive/Positive, Positive/Negative, Negative/Positive, Negative/Negative, Interest.

Michele Cardone
Michele Cardone

Postive Active

Positive Passive

Negative Active

Negative Passive

Interest